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  • Iraq family's flight reveals depth of Sunni grief 

    FILE - In this Friday, April 26, 2013 file photo, masked Sunni protesters wave Islamist flags while others chant slogans at an anti-government rally in Fallujah, 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq's Sunni minority have felt maligned by the Shiite-led government in Baghdad, hounded by its security forces and increasingly threatened, once again, by the militias that terrorized them during the darkest days of sectarian bloodletting in 2006 and 2007. The community's anger has fueled the rampage of Islamic extremists across a third of the country, including Fallujah, and Sunnis say their demands must be met by the new Shiite-led government if it hopes to be more inclusive. (AP Photo/Bilal Fawzi, File)BAGHDAD (AP) — For nearly a decade Abu Omar has been fleeing Iraq's many conflicts, but they always seem to catch up to him.


  • Shi'ite militia kill dozens of Iraqi Sunnis in mosque shooting By Raheem Salman and Alexander Dziadosz BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Iraqi Shi'ite militiamen machine gunned minority Sunni Muslims in a village mosque on Friday, killing dozens just as Baghdad was trying to build a cross-community government to fight Sunni militants whose rise has alarmed Western powers. Attacks on mosques are acutely sensitive and have in the past unleashed a deadly series of revenge killings and counter attacks in Iraq, where violence has returned to the levels of 2006-2007, the peak of a sectarian civil war.
  • Gaza gunmen execute 'collaborators'; mortar kills Israeli boy 

    A Hamas militant grabs a Palestinian suspected of collaborating with Israel in Gaza CityHamas-led gunmen in Gaza executed 18 Palestinians accused of collaborating with Israel on Friday, accelerating a crackdown on suspected informers after Israeli forces tracked down and killed three senior Hamas commanders. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu threatened to escalate the fight against Hamas, vowing the group would "pay a heavy price" after a four-year-old Israeli boy was killed by a mortar attack from Gaza, the first Israeli child to die in the six-week conflict. Shortly after his remarks, Palestinian officials said Israel had flattened a house in a Gaza City air strike, wounding at least 40 people. Israel's military spokesman said another ground war was possible if necessary to stop the rocket fire.


  • Britain 'will not work with Assad' to combat IS 

    Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond leaves Downing Street, central London, on August 20, 2014Britain will not work with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to combat Islamic State (IS) fighters in the country and his permission would not be needed for any military intervention, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said Friday. Hammond also said Britain had no plans to arm moderate fighters in Syria's civil war, and insisted that Western troops on the ground in Iraq would only make the situation worse. Responding to comments made by former army chief Richard Dannatt, who argued that Britain should consider some kind of alliance with Assad, Hammond warned that it would deepen sectarian rifts in the region.


  • Dempsey hits Islamic militant 'end-of-days' vision 

    FILE - This Aug. 20, 2014 file photo shows Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey speaking at Madison Square Garden in New York. During a Pentagon briefing Thursday, Dempsey said it's possible to contain the Islamic State militants, but it can't be done permanently without going after the group in Syria. Speaking to reporters with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, Dempsey said he wasn't predicting U.S. airstrikes in Syria, but said the problem must be addressed diplomatically, politically and militarily by America and its regional partners. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — America's top-ranked military officer says the surging Islamic State group has an "apocalyptic, end-of-days strategic vision" in the Middle East and cannot be defeated unless the United States and a coalition of partners confront it head-on in Syria.


  • Tunisia crackdown raises fears of rights rollback 

    FILE - In this Friday, March 2, 2012, file photo, Salafists hold posters showing Osama bin Laden during a demonstration near the U.S. embassy in Tunis, Tunisia. Mosques are being closed down, local organizations banned and at least 1,000 have been arrested as Tunisia carries out a wide-ranging crackdown against those suspected of sympathizing with radical Islamists. While still one of the only democracies to emerge from the Arab Spring uprisings, Tunisia's battle against terrorism is raising fears that it might be returning to its bad old days of political repression. (AP Photo/Amine Landoulsi, File)TUNIS, Tunisia (AP) — Mosques are being closed, local organizations banned and at least 1,000 people have been arrested as Tunisia cracks down on those suspected of sympathizing with radical Islamists.


  • At least 33 dead in bus crash in Egypt's Sinai At least 33 people died and dozens were injured when two buses collided before dawn on Friday in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, the state news agency and security sources reported. The Middle East News Agency (MENA) quoted local health ministry official Mohamed Lashin as saying that Russian, Yemeni and Saudi Arabian citizens were among the more than 40 people injured but did not give further details. The buses were traveling in the southern part of the Sinai, one of them from the Red Sea resort city of Sharm el-Sheikh and the other from a Nile Delta province, security sources said. Egypt's roads and railways have a poor safety record and Egyptians have long complained that successive governments have failed to enforce even basic safeguards, leading to frequent, deadly crashes.
  • Foley case lays bare debate over paying ransom 

    FILE - In this May 27, 2011, file photo shows American Journalist James Foley, of Rochester, N.H., as he poses for a photo in Boston. The beheading of Foley has forced a new debate over how the United States balances its unyielding policy against paying ransom to terrorist groups and saving the lives of Americans being held hostage by some of the world’s most dangerous extremists. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The beheading of freelance journalist James Foley has forced a new debate between the longtime U.S. and British refusal to negotiate with terrorists, and Europe and the Persian Gulf's increasing willingness to pay ransoms in a desperate attempt to free citizens. The dilemma: How to save the lives of captives without financing terror groups and encouraging more kidnappings.


  • British Muslims blame jihadi subculture after beheading video 

    Still image from undated video of a masked Islamic State militant holding a knife speaking next to man purported to be James Foley at an unknown locationBy Kate Holton and Raheem Salman LONDON/BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A British Muslim leader called for action on Thursday to tackle a jihadi sub-culture after an Islamic State video showed a suspected Briton beheading U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said the threat from Islamic State was "beyond anything we've seen" and the U.S. Justice Department opened a criminal investigation into the death of Foley on the video, which featured a masked man speaking English with a British accent. As Western officials tried to identify the man, the Muslim Council of Britain denounced Foley's "abhorrent murder" and one of its advisers urged anyone who knows the killer's identity to contact the police.


  • Libya football stadium hosts videotaped execution 

    A general view shows the eastern Libyan town of Derna on March 15, 2011An Islamist armed group carried out a videotaped execution of an Egyptian man in a football stadium in Libya, in what Amnesty said Friday highlighted the country's descent into lawlessness. The video of the execution in the eastern city of Derna was posted on social media websites, including YouTube. Amnesty International said it was carried out on August 19, apparently by an extremist militant group,the Shura Council of Islamic Youth, in front of a crowd seated in the stadium. "This unlawful killing realises the greatest fears of ordinary Libyans, who in parts of the country find themselves caught between ruthless armed groups and a failed state," said Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, Amnesty International's Middle East and North Africa Deputy Director.


  • Iraq presses anti-jihadist push as US eyes Syria ops 

    Peshmerga fighters inspect the remains of a car, which belonged to Islamic State militants, bearing an image of the jihadist flag, after it was targeted by an American air strike in the village of Baqufa, north of Mosul, August 18, 2014Iraqi forces battled militants northeast of Baghdad Friday, as Washington said a powerful jihadist group was "beyond anything" it has seen and that operations in Syria may also be needed. Pentagon chiefs warned of the dangers of the Islamic State (IS), a slick, well-funded operation powered by an "apocalyptic end of days" ideology as the West reeled from the grisly execution of American journalist James Foley. Iraqi government troops and Kurdish forces launched an operation on Friday aimed at retaking the Jalawla area of Diyala province, northeast of the capital, from militants who seized it on August 11, officers said. The operation came after Pentagon chiefs said that defeating IS, which spearheaded an offensive that overran swathes of Iraq, will require efforts across the region, including in neighbouring Syria, where the jihadists also control large areas.


  • Some US colleges calling students back from Israel 

    In this 2014 photo provided by Michigan State University, students in the school's Summer Study Abroad Program take a break while hiking in Israel. Some U.S. colleges have now pulled students from their overseas study programs in Israel as the Gaza war rages. Colleges site security as the top concern. (AP Photo/Michigan State University)HARTFORD, Connecticut (AP) — Some U.S. colleges are pulling students from overseas study programs in Israel as the Gaza war rages, though the relative calm beyond the immediate battle areas is raising questions in some quarters about why they had to leave.


  • Islamic State 'beyond anything we've seen': US 

    An image made available by the jihadist Twitter account Al-Baraka News on June 9, 2014 allegedly shows Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant militants waving the trademark Jihadist flag on the Syrian-Iraqi borderThe Islamic State poses a greater danger than a conventional "terrorist group" and is pursuing a vision that could radically alter the face of the Middle East, US defense leaders said Thursday. The IS jihadists could be contained and eventually defeated by local forces backed by the United States, but the Sunni population in both Syria and Iraq would need to reject the group, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and General Martin Dempsey told reporters. Hagel warned that the Islamic State is better armed, trained and funded than any recent militant threat.


  • Justice elusive for Syria chemical attack victims: HRW 

    An image grab taken from Syrian television on October 10, 2013 shows inspectors from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) at work at an undisclosed location in SyriaHuman Rights Watch Thursday said that hundreds of victims of a chemical weapons attack in Syria remained without justice one year on, days after Damascus's stockpile was completely destroyed. The report came as a monitor said Syria's three-year war has now killed more than 180,000 people, and as France announced it delivered weapons to rebels battling to topple the regime months ago. Thursday was the first anniversary of the chemical attack on the capital's Ghouta region, a stronghold of the rebel movement, which the United States estimated killed up to 1,400 people. After a global outcry and American threats to strike regime positions, Assad agreed to an international plan to destroy Syria's chemical weapons stockpile.


  • Syria opposition: Deadly chemical attack forgotten 

    FILE - This Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013 file image provided by Shaam News Network, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, purports to show bodies of victims of an attack on Ghouta, Syria. An international human rights group says on the anniversary of the deadly chemical attack outside Damascus that “justice remains elusive” for the victims and their families. (AP Photo/Shaam News Network, File)BEIRUT (AP) — The year since a chemical attack that killed hundreds near Damascus has been a strikingly good one for President Bashar Assad.


  • Turkish foreign minister set to be Erdogan's new PM 

    Turkey's Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu attends a meeting in AnkaraBy Gulsen Solaker ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkish president-elect Tayyip Erdogan named Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu as his future prime minister on Thursday and said a power struggle with a U.S.-based cleric, a Kurdish peace process and a new constitution would be his top priorities. Erdogan said the ruling AK Party's executive board had agreed to nominate Davutoglu as its next leader and, by default, his future premier. The decision must now be endorsed in a party vote next Wednesday, but is unlikely to be opposed. ...


  • Davutoglu: controversial architect of Turkey's foreign policy 

    Turkey's Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (C) arrives for a meeting in Ankara, on August 20, 2014Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, who will be Turkey's next prime minister, is a loyal ally of incoming president Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the chief architect of an assertive but increasingly controversial foreign policy. Davutoglu was named by the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) as its sole candidate to be new leader and prime minister to replace Erdogan. Davutoglu's mild-mannered and smiling demeanour belies his abilities as a tough negotiator and strategic thinker, who has been at the heart of government since Erdogan first came to power. His foreign policy defined Ankara as a regional power broker but Davutoglu, 55, has come under fire in recent months over Turkey's increasing diplomatic isolation.


  • Turkey's Davutoglu named new premier 

    Turkey's president-elect Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, greets Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu after he announced Davutoglu as his ruling Justice and Development Party's new leader, in Ankara, Turkey, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Davutoglu, hand-picked by president-elect Erdogan to succeed him as prime minister, is expected to accept the largely backseat role although he is known to be an ambitious politician. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Recep Tayyip Erdogan named Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu as his successor as prime minister on Thursday, with expectations high that the man who has dominated Turkish politics for more than a decade will stay in charge once he is president.


  • 'Ambiguous warfare' providing NATO with new challenge By Peter Apps WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Since Russia's annexation of Crimea in March, NATO has been publicly refocusing on its old Cold War foe Moscow. The threats it now believes it faces, however, are distinctly different to those of the latter half of the 20th century.     The West then was defending against the risk of Soviet armor pouring across the North German plain. Now, officials and experts say, it is "ambiguous warfare" that is focusing minds within NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Confrontations are viewed as more likely to start with cyber attacks or covert action to stir up Russian minorities in Europe's east than from any overt aggression.   So as NATO prepares for its summit on September 4 and 5 in Wales, it is having to come to grips with relatively new threats to test Article 5 of its treaty. Since NATO's post-Cold War expansion that has meant protecting eastern members including the Baltic states.
  • Foley's death isn't changing views in Congress 

    In this June 17, 2011 photo, journalist James Foley receives applause from students at the Christa McAuliffe Regional Charter Public School in Framingham, Mass. Foley had been released a month prior after being detained for six weeks in Libya. Students at the school had written government leaders to work for his release. Foley was abducted in November 2012 while covering the Syrian conflict. Islamic militants posted a video showing his murder on Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, and said they killed him because the U.S. had launched airstrikes in northern Iraq. (AP Photo/MetroWest Daily News, Ken McGagh) MANDATORY CREDITWASHINGTON (AP) — The beheading of an American journalist in Syria appears unlikely to change lawmakers' minds about military intervention against Islamic State extremists. It's equally unclear whether the Obama administration will be asking them to back a new U.S. approach.


  • Turkey's Davutoglu expected to be a docile premier 

    Turkey's president-elect Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, greets Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu after he announced Davutoglu as his ruling Justice and Development Party's new leader, in Ankara, Turkey, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Davutoglu, hand-picked by president-elect Erdogan to succeed him as prime minister, is expected to accept the largely backseat role although he is known to be an ambitious politician. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, hand-picked by president-elect Recep Tayyip Erdogan to succeed him as prime minister, is expected to accept a largely backseat role as his boss strives to make his new job the most powerful position in the land.


  • Voice, image give clues in hunt for Foley's killer 

    In this June 17, 2011 photo, journalist James Foley receives applause from students at the Christa McAuliffe Regional Charter Public School in Framingham, Mass. Foley had been released a month prior after being detained for six weeks in Libya. Students at the school had written government leaders to work for his release. Foley was abducted in November 2012 while covering the Syrian conflict. Islamic militants posted a video showing his murder on Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, and said they killed him because the U.S. had launched airstrikes in northern Iraq. (AP Photo/MetroWest Daily News, Ken McGagh) MANDATORY CREDITLONDON (AP) — The Islamic militant in a video showing the death of American journalist James Foley took great care to disguise his identity, dressing head-to-toe in black, with a mask leaving only his eyes visible.


  • Syria sees Islamist threat bringing detente with West, but not soon 

    Militant Islamist fighters waving flags, travel in vehicles as they take part in a military parade along streets of Syria's northern Raqqa provinceBy Tom Perry BEIRUT (Reuters) - Syria is wagering that Islamic State's push to reshape the Middle East will eventually force a hostile West to deal with President Bashar al-Assad as the only way to tackle the threat. While Assad's forces escalate their fight with Islamic State militants in the Syrian civil war, the United States is staging air strikes on the same group across the frontier in Iraq. This, along with United Nations sanctions targeting the Sunni Muslim militants in both Syria and Iraq, has strengthened Assad's belief that the United States and Europe are coming around to his way of viewing the conflict, according to sources familiar with Syrian government thinking.


  • As US airstrikes in Iraq grow, details stay thin 

    Displaced Iraqis settle at a new camp outside the Bajid Kandala camp in Feeshkhabour town, Iraq, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014. Some 1.5 million people have been displaced by fighting in Iraq since the Islamic State's rapid advance began in June, and thousands more have died. The scale of the humanitarian crisis prompted the U.N. to declare its highest level of emergency last week. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)WASHINGTON (AP) — America has returned to war, of a sort, in Iraq with airstrikes that have intensified in recent days against Islamic State militants. But details about the execution of this limited campaign, which so far includes no reported U.S. ground combat, are thin.


  • Interpol urges world response to Iraq extremists 

    Diane and John Foley talk to reporters after speaking with U.S. President Barack Obama Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014 outside their home in Rochester, N.H. Their son, James Foley was abducted in November 2012 while covering the Syrian conflict. Islamic militants posted a video showing his murder on Tuesday and said they killed him because the U.S. had launched airs trikes in northern Iraq. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)PARIS (AP) — Interpol says the killing of an American journalist kidnapped in Syria shows the need for a coordinated international effort against the stream of foreign fighters joining extremists in the Middle East.


  • Beheading spurs new attacks on Islamic militants 

    FILE - This file photo posted on the website freejamesfoley.org shows journalist James Foley in Aleppo, Syria, in July, 2012.In a horrifying act of revenge for U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq, militants with the Islamic State extremist group have beheaded Foley — and are threatening to kill another hostage, U.S. officials say. (AP Photo/freejamesfoley.org, Nicole Tung, File) NO SALESWASHINGTON (AP) — The United States launched a new barrage of airstrikes against the Islamic State extremist group that beheaded American journalist James Foley and that has seized a swath of territory across Iraq and Syria. President Barack Obama vowed relentless pursuit of the terrorists and the White House revealed that the U.S. had launched a secret rescue mission inside Syria earlier this summer that failed to rescue Foley and other Americans still being held hostage.


  • Malaysian militants bought bomb material for planned attack: official By Stuart Grudgings and Trinna Leong KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Suspected Malaysian militants loyal to the extremist Islamic State movement bought bomb-making material ahead of a proposed attack on a Carlsberg brewery near the capital Kuala Lumpur, a top anti-terrorism official said. The plan, which the official said was at a "discussion" stage, would be the first time Southeast Asian militants inspired by Islamic State's rise have sought to launch a major attack at home, adding to officials' fears of a domestic "blowback" from Islamic State's expansion in Syria and Iraq. Ayob Khan Mydin, the police counter-terrorism division's deputy chief, told Reuters that the group of 19 suspected militants had attained aluminum powder, which is often used as an ingredient in bombs. "In terms of ideology and intention it was very clear," Ayob Khan said in an interview.
  • Obama unlikely to deepen Iraq military involvement, say U.S. officials By Missy Ryan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Despite outrage at home and abroad over the grisly beheading of an American journalist, President Barack Obama is unlikely to deepen military involvement in Iraq or Syria and will instead stay the course with U.S.
  • U.S. forces tried but failed to rescue U.S. hostages in Syria 

    U.S. journalist James Foley arrives, after being released by the Libyan government, at Rixos hotel in TripoliThe mission, authorized by President Barack Obama based on U.S. The incident, in which a number of militants were killed, appeared to be the first direct ground engagement between the United States and Islamic State militants, seen by Obama as a growing threat in the Middle East.


  • US reveals failed bid to rescue hostages 

    An image made available by the jihadist Twitter account Al-Baraka News on June 9, 2014 allegedly shows Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant militants waving the trademark Jihadist flag on the Syrian-Iraqi borderUS special forces were sent into Syria this year to try to rescue American hostages held by Islamist militants, US officials said, as international revulsion mounted Thursday over the beheading of journalist James Foley. President Barack Obama demanded that the world take action against the "cancer" of jihadist extremism after the execution of the American journalist by Islamic State militants who have seized swathes of Syria and Iraq.


  • Obama: U.S. won't stop confronting Islamic State 

    FILE - This undated file still image from video released April 7, 2011, by GlobalPost, shows James Foley of Rochester, N.H., a freelance contributor for GlobalPost, in Benghazi, Libya. In a horrifying act of revenge for U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq, militants with the Islamic State extremist group have beheaded Foley — and are threatening to kill another hostage, U.S. officials say. (AP Photo/GlobalPost, File)President Barack Obama pledged Wednesday to continue to confront Islamic State militants despite the beheading of an American journalist in Iraq, standing firm in the face of the militants' threats to kill another hostage unless the U.S. military changes course.


  • Beheading video puts spotlight on British jihadists 

    An image grab uploaded on June 19, 2014 shows Abu Muthanna al-Yemeni (C), believed to be Nasser Muthana, a 20-year-old man from Cardiff, Wales, speaking in a video from an undisclosed locationThe distinct English accent of the militant seen beheading US journalist James Foley in a grisly online video has forced Britain once again to confront the question of how it became an exporter of jihadist fighters. The video, published on Tuesday, has also left Britain nervously wondering how many potential jihadists are walking its streets and whether the return of fighters from Iraq and Syria will bring the violence home. Experts say young British men are often driven into the arms of jihadist groups such as the Islamic State (IS) by adolescent feelings of alienation, often resulting from their backgrounds as second or third generation of immigrant families, as well as poor economic prospects which they contrast with the perceived glory of bloody martyrdom.


  • Iran moving to meet terms of extended nuclear deal: IAEA 

    Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif meets with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at talks between the foreign ministers of the six powers negotiating with Tehran on its nuclear program in ViennaBy Fredrik Dahl VIENNA (Reuters) - Iran has started taking action to comply with the terms of an extended agreement with six world powers over its disputed atomic activities, a U.N. nuclear watchdog report obtained by Reuters on Wednesday showed. The findings in a monthly update by the International Atomic Energy Agency - though no major surprise - may be seen as positive by the West ahead of the expected resumption next month of negotiations on ending the decade-old nuclear dispute. The IAEA document made clear that Iran is continuing to meet its commitments under the interim accord that it reached with the United States, France, Germany, Britain, China and Russia late last year and that took effect in January. The IAEA is tasked with checking that Iran is living up to its part of the agreement, which was designed to buy time for talks on a comprehensive settlement of the standoff that would dispel fears of a new Middle East war.


  • Islamic State opens new anti-U.S. front with beheading video On Tuesday night, Islamic State released a video of its fighters beheading James Foley, who was kidnapped in Syria nearly two years ago. The black-clad executioner, who spoke English with a British accent, also produced another American journalist and said his fate depends on President Barack Obama's next move.
  • Erdogan allies likely to dominate Turkey's new cabinet 

    Turkey's Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan addresses members of his ruling AK Party (AKP) during a meeting at the party headquarters in AnkaraBy Orhan Coskun and Jonny Hogg ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkish president-elect Tayyip Erdogan looks set to maintain his influence on daily politics after being sworn in next week, with close allies likely to take on cabinet posts in a new government and his economic team expected to remain largely intact. Outgoing president Abdullah Gul said on Tuesday that Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu was likely to take over as chairman of the party and become the next prime minister, rekindling speculation about the shape of the new cabinet. Davutoglu, an academic who has served as Erdogan's foreign minister for the past five years, is expected to be confirmed as the ruling AK Party's nominee for chairman on Thursday before being formally voted in at an AK general assembly on August 27. Senior AK officials told Reuters that ministers responsible for the economy would remain in place under Davutoglu, and that close Erdogan allies including his top aide Yalcin Akdogan and intelligence chief Hakan Fidan might be given cabinet positions.


  • Austrian police arrest 9 suspected extremists VIENNA (AP) — Austrian police have arrested nine foreigners suspected of seeking to join Islamic extremists fighting in Syria.
  • Adversaries seize chance to lecture U.S. on Ferguson unrest By Angus MacSwan LONDON (Reuters) - Governments scolded by the United States over their human rights records have seized on racial unrest and a police crackdown in the Missouri town of Ferguson to wag their fingers back in disapproval. Adversaries and uneasy allies from Russia and Iran to China and Egypt have accused the United States of hypocrisy as images of police brandishing lethal weapons and tear-gassing protesters have been shown around the world. Many of the countries draw criticism of their own democratic credentials from independent rights group as well as the U.S. Nonetheless, activists say the events in Ferguson, where the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman has provoked 11 nights of protests, undermine the United States' credibility in criticizing others.
  • FBI believes Foley video is authentic: GlobalPost The FBI believes the Islamic State video purporting to show the beheading of American journalist James Foley is authentic, GlobalPost reported on Wednesday. "The FBI on Wednesday morning told the Foley family they believe the video is authentic," according to GlobalPost, a Boston-based online publication that employed Foley as a freelancer. President Barack Obama, who is on vacation on the Massachusetts island of Martha's Vineyard, is likely to comment on the video later in the day, a U.S.
  • UK 'urgently investigates' suspected British executioner in Foley video British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond says that the government is "urgently investigating" the identity of the apparently British executioner of US reporter James Foley, whose death was shown in a video released by members of the self-declared Islamic State in Syria. The video published overnight on YouTube shows the hooded, black-clad IS member speaking extensively in both English and Arabic before killing an orange-jumpsuited man described as "James Wright Foley, an American citizen." In what the Daily Telegraph describes as a London accent, the executioner says that the US has "been at the forefront of the aggression towards the Islamic State," before killing Foley. Foley went missing in Syria in November 2012, after militants stopped his car, reports Foster's Daily Democrat, a newspaper covering his hometown of Rochester, N.H. He had reported from several conflict zones in the Middle East, including Syria, Iraq, and Libya, where he was also briefly held by kidnappers. Foley was freelancing for Agence France-Presse and the GlobalPost when he was taken in Syria.
  • New Indian football league all set to take shape NEW DELHI (AP) — Retired batting great Sachin Tendulkar will lead a clutch of former cricketers and movie stars in promoting the start of the Indian football league.

 

 

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