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  • PM Modi seeks Saudi help to rescue Indians from Yemen 

    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, pictured here in New Delhi on February 16, 2015, asked Saudi Arabia's new king for his support in efforts to evacuate some 4,000 stranded Indians from war-torn YemenPrime Minister Narendra Modi on Monday asked Saudi Arabia's new king for his support in efforts to evacuate some 4,000 stranded Indians from war-torn Yemen. Modi expressed his "deep concern about the safety and welfare of the approximately 4,000 Indian citizens in Yemen" when Saudi King Salman telephoned him late evening, the Indian foreign ministry said. "Prime minister briefed his majesty King Salman on India's evacuation plan and requested his majesty's support and cooperation," a ministry statement said, adding that the king assured Modi of "all possible assistance". India has moved to airlift its citizens from the Middle East country, which has been plunged into chaos by a Huthi Shiite rebellion that has triggered Saudi-backed air strikes on the capital Sanaa.


  • 'Yes or no' time as Iran nuclear talks near deadline 

    Representatives of European and world powers pictured prior to meeting to pin down a nuclear deal with Iran, at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne on March 30, 2015Global powers raced against the clock Monday on the eve of a deadline to nail down the final pieces of a framework deal aimed at putting any Iranian nuclear bomb out of reach. Adding to the drama, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov left the crunch talks with Iran in Switzerland after a series of meetings, Russian media reported. Lavrov and his counterparts from the United States, China, Britain, France and Germany met with the Iranians in a lakeside Lausanne hotel on Monday for their first full session since missing a previous November deadline. Global powers have set a midnight Tuesday deadline to agree the outlines of a deal that they will then try to finalise by June 30.


  • Erdogan says Iran visit still on despite 'domination' row 

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on March 30, 2015 in LjubljanaPresident Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday insisted he was still planning to visit Iran next week, despite a war-of-words with the Islamic republic triggered by the Yemen crisis and his accusations Tehran was seeking domination of the region. Majority Sunni Muslim Turkey has said it supports the Saudi-led operation against Iran-allied Huthi Shiite rebels in Yemen to restore order in the country. Meanwhile Iran announced Monday it had "invited" the Turkish envoy to the foreign ministry for an explanation after Erdogan said last week that Tehran's bid for domination of the region could no longer be tolerated.


  • NATO chief seeks closer cooperation with the European Union BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO'S secretary-general wants more joint action with the European Union to face the security challenges coming from Russia and the violent Islamic extremism plaguing some countries in the Middle East and North Africa.
  • US drone 'killed two Iranian troops in Iraq' 

    A US Air Force MQ-9 Reaper drone takes off from Kandahar Air Base, Afghanistan on March 13, 2009Two Iranian Revolutionary Guardsmen were killed by a US drone in the Iraqi city of Tikrit, Iranian state media said Monday, in a report that was denied by the Pentagon. The official IRNA news agency said the two had been posted to Iraq as advisers in the war against Islamic State (IS) group jihadists and that they died in the drone strike on March 23. Pictures of the two men, named as Ali Yazdani and Hadi Jafari, were posted on Iranian news websites after their funerals on home soil. The Fars news agency called Jafari, 29, the third "martyr in defence of the shrines" from the northern Iranian city of Amol.


  • Nuclear deal would reward Iran for Yemen 'aggression': Israel 

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu chairs the weekly cabinet meeting at his Jerusalem office on March 29, 2015Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned world powers on Monday that any nuclear deal they strike with Iran would be seen as a reward for Tehran's alleged "aggression" in Yemen. "The agreement being formulated in Lausanne sends a message that there is no price for aggression and on the contrary -- that Iran's aggression is to be rewarded," he said, referring to Iranian support for Shiite Huthi rebels in Yemen. "The moderate and responsible countries in the region, especially Israel and also many other countries, will be the first to be hurt by this agreement," said Netanyahu, who has waged a campaign against a nuclear deal with Tehran.


  • AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the Middle East Across the Middle East this week, a Saudi-led coalition of predominantly Sunni Arab countries launched a campaign of airstrikes targeting Shiite rebels and their allies in Yemen.
  • Iran nuclear talks race towards key deadline 

    (R-L) Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, EU High Representative Federica Mogherini and EU Political Director Helga Schmid with foreign ministers before the start of the P5+1 meeting at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne on March 30, 2015Foreign ministers from major powers pressed their Iranian counterpart on Monday as they sought to slot into place the final but also the trickiest pieces of a deal curtailing Tehran's nuclear programme as Tuesday's deadline loomed. Britain's Philip Hammond said as he became the last of the foreign ministers to arrive in a rainy Switzerland that they "believe a deal can be done". "But it has to be a deal which puts the bomb beyond Iran's reach," he said. With time of the essence, US Secretary of State John Kerry, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, Hammond and the top diplomats of Russia, China, France and Germany are meeting for the first time since November.


  • Officials: Iran nuke talks solving some issues, not others 

    From left, U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz wait to start a meeting with Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and others at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Sunday, March 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Iran is considering demands for further cuts to its uranium enrichment program but is pushing back on how long it must limit technology it could use to make atomic arms, Western officials involved in the nuclear talks said Sunday.


  • Arabs vow to pound Yemen rebels until they surrender 

    Yemeni Shiite Huthi rebels and supporters take part in a demonstration in the southwestern city of Taez against the Saudi-led military intervention in the country, on March 29, 2015Saudi-led warplanes bombed Yemen's main international airport and a renegade troop base in the capital Sunday, as Arab leaders vowed to pummel Iranian-backed rebels until they surrender. Yemen's President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi has urged his Arab allies to keep bombing until the Huthi Shiite rebels are defeated, branding them Iran's "puppet". His Foreign Minister Riyadh Yassin said there could be "no negotiations and dialogue" with the rebels "until the legitimate government has control over all Yemeni lands". Arab League chief Nabil al-Arabi said at a regional summit in Egypt the offensive would last until the rebels "surrender" their weapons and withdraw from areas they seized.


  • Saudi response to Swedish criticism tests Europe's reach 

    FILE- In this Wednesday, March 11, 2015 file photo, Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom gestures during a media interview at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in central Stockholm, Sweden. Wallstrom isn't the first diplomat to have expressed concerns about Saudi Arabia's human rights record. But when she used the word “dictatorship,” in a speech in February, 2015, she crossed a red line for the kingdom at a time of intense regional turmoil, setting off a diplomatic crisis that has underscored the perils of promoting reform four years after the Arab Spring. (AP Photo/Claudio Bresciani, TT, File) SWEDEN OUTDUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Sweden's foreign minister is hardly the first diplomat to raise concerns about Saudi Arabia's human rights record, but when she used the word "dictatorship" in a speech last month she crossed a red line for the kingdom at a time of intense regional turmoil, igniting a diplomatic crisis.


  • 'Dangerous accord' with Iran worse than Israel feared: PM 

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu renews his denunciations of an Iranian nuclear dealIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday denounced as "dangerous" a nuclear accord that world powers are negotiating with Iran, saying it goes beyond what his government had feared. "The dangerous accord which is being negotiated in Lausanne (Switzerland) confirms our concerns and even worse," Netanyahu said in remarks at a meeting of his cabinet broadcast on public radio. The premier warned that Iran could be in a position to "conquer" the Middle East through what he called the "axis" of control it has over the capitals of Iraq, Lebanon and Syria. Netanyahu angered the White House when he addressed a joint session of the Congress to warn against a nuclear deal with Iran in the lead-up to Israel's March 17 general election.


  • Arab leaders agree joint military force 

    (Front from L-R) Egypt's President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, Kuwait Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad Al-Sabah, Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud, Yemeni President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi and Sudanese President Omar al Bashir (middle-C)Arab leaders agreed on Sunday to form a joint military force after a summit dominated by a Saudi-led offensive on Shiite rebels in Yemen and the threat from Islamist extremism. "Assuming the great responsibility imposed by the great challenges facing our Arab nation and threatening its capabilities, the Arab leaders had decided to agree on the principle of a joint Arab military force," Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi told the summit in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh. The decision was mostly aimed at fighting jihadists who have overrun swathes of Iraq and Syria and secured a foothold in Libya, Arab League chief Nabil al-Arabi said ahead of the summit. Egypt had pushed for the creation of the rapid response force to fight militants, and the matter gained urgency this week after Saudi Arabia and Arab allies launched air strikes on Huthi rebels in Yemen.


  • Israeli PM lashes out as Iran nuclear talks intensify 

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu chairs the weekly cabinet meeting at his Jerusalem office on March 29, 2015Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a dire warning Sunday about a possible nuclear accord with Iran as talks in Switzerland towards the outline of a deal intensified days before a deadline. He said the "Iran-Lausanne-Yemen axis" was "dangerous for all of humanity" and that combined with Tehran's regional influence, a nuclear deal could allow Iran to "conquer" the Middle East. Israel, widely assumed to have nuclear weapons itself, is concerned that a deal that six powers are trying to agree the contours of by midnight on March 31 will fail to stop Iran from getting the bomb. Iran, hit hard by international sanctions, denies wanting nuclear weapons and insists that its atomic programme is purely for peaceful purposes.


  • UN staff flee war-torn Yemen, Russia voices concern 

    Shiite Huthi militiamen sit on a pick-up truck mounted with a heavy machine-gun in the Yememi capital Sanaa on March 26, 2015The United Nations evacuated staff from war-torn Yemen as Russia warned Saudi-led air strikes on Iranian-backed rebels were affecting crunch nuclear talks between world powers and Tehran. Yemen's President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi urged his Arab allies to keep up the bombing raids in his country until the Huthi Shiite rebels surrender, branding them Iran's "puppet". A Sunni Arab coalition, led by Saudi Arabia and other Gulf monarchies, is battling to avoid having a pro-Iran regime on its doorstep, as the Huthi rebels tighten the noose around Hadi's southern stronghold of Aden.


  • World's huddled masses use 4 key land, sea routes to Europe 

    Map shows main migration routes into EU countries; 2c x 4 1/2 inches; 96.3 mm x 114 mm;DUBLIN (AP) — Most migrants who live illegally in the European Union fly to the 28-nation bloc on valid visas and simply overstay their welcome. But for the poorest and most desperate travelers of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, the journey often takes months by sea or land, with payments to trafficking gangs.


  • Migrants' newest route to Europe means an epic Balkans trek 

    In this Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015 photo West African migrants walk on train tracks on their way towards the border with Macedonia near the town of Evzonoi, Greece. The tide of hopeful migrants pours through the vulnerable 'back-door' countries in the hope of entering the 28-nation European Union, and although most people don't make it, the human tide continues to grow, according to Frontex, the EU agency that helps governments police the bloc’s leaky frontiers. (AP Photo/Dalton Bennett)THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) — Migrants from Africa, Asia and the Middle East take many routes to cross illegally into the European Union, and all are fraught with likely disappointment and occasional danger. The newest path, through the EU's Balkans back door, comes with a cruel twist: an epic 250-kilometer (150-mile) walk that is surging in popularity even though most who try it fail.


  • Malaysia poised to sign new F1 hosting deal 

    Sauber driver Raffaele Marciello of Italy steers his car during the first practice session for the Malaysian Formula One Grand Prix at Sepang International Circuit in Sepang, Malaysia Friday, March 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)SEPANG, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysian Grand Prix organizers are poised to sign a new three-year contract to host Formula One at the Sepang International Circuit, with a final agreement expected next month.


  • After the fight, US eyes Netanyahu's next move 

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu visits the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem following his party's victory in general elections, on March 18Barack Obama's sustained public criticism of Netanyahu's election rhetoric has led to allegations of a personal vendetta and even a touch of presidential petulance. Obama has steadfastly rebuffed Netanyahu's efforts to row back his election-time opposition to a Palestinian state. "It's has been a continuously running soap opera between Netanyahu and Obama," said Aaron David Miller, a former advisor to Republican and Democratic secretaries of state.


  • Arab warplanes pummel Yemen rebels as Hadi meets allies 

    Yemeni supporters of the southern separatist movement stand next to a tank bearing the movement's flag which they confiscated from a military depot, in the southern Yemeni city of Aden on March 27, 2015Arab warplanes pounded Iranian-backed rebels in Yemen for a third night while President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi held summit talks in Egypt Saturday with regional allies seeking to prevent his overthrow. An Arab coalition, led by Saudi Arabia and other Sunni-ruled Gulf monarchies, is battling to avoid having a pro-Iran regime on its doorstep, as Shiite Huthi rebels tighten the noose around Hadi's southern stronghold. Air strikes against the rebels could last up to six months, Gulf diplomatic officials said, voicing fears that they could face retaliation at home by Iran. Heavy strikes shook the rebel-held capital Sanaa for a third consecutive night until dawn on Saturday, residents said.


  • Saudi ground troops would face Yemen 'quagmire': experts 

    A Yemeni man wearing military fatigues sits on debris at the site of a Saudi air strike against Huthi rebels near Sanaa Airport on March 26, 2015Saudi-led airstrikes alone are unlikely to crush Iranian-backed Yemeni rebels but a ground incursion would risk a bloody "quagmire" and escalating tensions with Tehran, experts say. Saudi Arabia pledged to do "whatever it takes" to defend its ally President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi after launching aerial raids against the Huthi Shiite fighters and their allies. "History shows that airstrikes without corresponding ground forces do not produce a decisive victory," said Frederic Wehrey of the US-based Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. "If Saudi Arabia relies only on airstrikes and civilian casualties start mounting they will lose support very, very quickly," said Sultan Barakat, research director at the Doha-based Brookings Institution.


  • Warships move in key strait as airstrikes widen in Yemen 

    Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, hold up their weapons to protest against Saudi-led airstrikes, as they chant slogans during a rally in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, March 26, 2015. Saudi Arabia bombed key military installations in Yemen on Thursday, leading a regional coalition in a campaign against Shiite rebels who have taken over much of the country and drove out the president. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)SANAA, Yemen (AP) — As airstrikes in Yemen intensified on their second day Friday, Egypt and Saudi Arabia were considering an intervention on the ground, aimed at giving the president a secure foothold to return to the country, while backing Sunni tribesmen to fight against Shiite rebels and their allies, military officials said.


  • Yemen's Aden a key battleground in conflict 

    A Yemeni man carries a box of ammunition he took from a military depot in Aden, Yemen, Friday, March 27, 2015. Shiite rebels, known as the Houthis, has seized the city since Wednesday. Looters have then taken weapons and ammunition from two abandoned army camps. (AP Photo/Yassir Hassan)SHARM EL-SHEIKH, Egypt (AP) — Yemen's city of Aden, a vital Arabian Sea port for centuries, is emerging as a key battleground in the fight between a Saudi-led Arab coalition backing the country's president and Shiite rebels and their allies.


  • A look at America's complicated collage of a Mideast policy 

    In this March 26, 2015, photo, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, center, leaves a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and other U.S. officials at a hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland. U.S. and Iranian diplomats gather at a Baroque palace in Europe, a historic nuclear agreement within reach. Over Iraq’s deserts, their militaries fight a common foe. Leaders in Washington and Tehran, capitals once a million miles from each other in ideological terms, wrestle for the first time in decades with the notion of a rapprochement. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States' engagement in the volatile and unpredictable Middle East got more complicated this week, as American and Iranian negotiators sought a historic nuclear agreement while the U.S. provided intelligence for a Saudi-led air campaign against Iran-backed rebels in Yemen.


  • French FM warns Middle East minorities could 'disappear entirely' 

    Displaced Iraqi families from the Yazidi community cross the Iraqi-Syrian border at the Fishkhabur crossing in northern Iraq on August 13, 2014Christians, Yazidis and other religious minorities under attack in the Middle East could "disappear entirely" unless the world takes action to protect them, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said Friday. Fabius told a UN Security Council debate that an "action charter" was needed to address the violence that saw 20 Coptic Christians beheaded in Libya last month. "The danger is that minorities will disappear entirely," Fabius said. Islamic State militants in Iraq, Syria and Libya have targeted religious minorities in attacks, notably Yazidis in a campaign that UN investigators have said probably amounts to genocide.


  • Israel says to release Palestinian tax funds, US welcomes 

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pictured during the weekly cabinet meeting at his Jerusalem office on January 4, 2015Israel said Friday it will release hundreds of millions of dollars in tax funds it has withheld from the Palestinian Authority as a punitive measure. The United States swiftly welcomed the move, which could help disarm tensions with Washington and the international community after a polarising Israeli election campaign. "We welcome the decision of the prime minister of Israel to release withheld tax revenues to the Palestinian Authority," said US State Department spokesman Jeff Rathke. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's office said revenues accumulated over three months, frozen by Israel since January in retaliation for a Palestinian move to join the International Criminal Court (ICC), would be transferred after normal deductions for services.


  • Israel to stop withholding Palestinian tax revenues JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel said Friday that it will transfer Palestinian tax revenues it has been withholding as punishment for the Palestinians' application to join the International Criminal Court.
  • Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer dies at 83 

    FILE - This is a Oct. 6, 2011 file photo of Swedish poet and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Tomas Transtromer. Swedish publisher Bonniers said Friday March 27, 2015 that Swedish poet and Nobel Literature Prize winner Tomas Transtromer has died at age 83. (AP Photo/ Maja Suslin, SCANPIX , File) SWEDEN OUTSTOCKHOLM (AP) — Swedish poet and Nobel Literature Prize winner Tomas Transtromer has died at age 83, Swedish publisher Bonniers said Friday.


  • EU weighs new methods to coax Israel back to peace talks 

    EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini, speaks during a press conference with Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic, during her first visit in Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, March 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is assessing new ways to push Israel back to the peace negotiating table with the Palestinians for a deal based on a two-state solution, working in tandem with the United States, EU officials say.


  • Bernie Ecclestone casts doubt on German, Italian GPs 

    Ferrari driver Sebastian Vettel of Germany steers his car during the second practice session for the Malaysian Formula One Grand Prix at Sepang International Circuit in Sepang, Malaysia Friday, March 27, 2015.(AP Photo/Thomas Lam)SEPANG, Malaysia (AP) — The German Grand Prix could remain off the sport's calendar after this year's cancellation, and the iconic Italian GP may be next to go, Formula One commercial head Bernie Ecclestone said Friday.


  • Complex US-Iran ties at heart of complicated Mideast policy 

    In this March 26, 2015, photo, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, center, leaves a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and other U.S. officials at a hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland. U.S. and Iranian diplomats gather at a Baroque palace in Europe, a historic nuclear agreement within reach. Over Iraq’s deserts, their militaries fight a common foe. Leaders in Washington and Tehran, capitals once a million miles from each other in ideological terms, wrestle for the first time in decades with the notion of a rapprochement. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. and Iranian diplomats gather at a Baroque palace in Europe, a historic nuclear agreement within reach. Over Iraq's deserts, their militaries fight a common foe. Leaders in Washington and Tehran, capitals once a million miles from each other in ideological terms, wrestle for the first time in decades with the notion of a rapprochement.


  • Stocks recover their poise ahead of US economic data 

    Men walk past an electronic stock board of a securities firm in Tokyo, Friday, March 27, 2015. Asian shares were lackluster Friday as the conflict in Yemen ripped through the Middle East and Japanese data showed the world's No. 3 economy is still in the doldrums. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)LONDON (AP) — Global stock markets on Friday recovered their poise after the previous day's losses when investors were spooked by the escalating conflict in Yemen. However, oil prices slipped back from Thursday's sizeable advance when traders worried about the conflict's impact on oil supplies.


  • Swiss private bank UBP buys international arm of Coutts 

    The entrance to Coutts in central London, pictured here guarded by police for May Day demonstrations targetting the bank for the rich and famousState-rescued Royal Bank of Scotland on Friday said it has sold the international arm of Coutts private bank to Swiss peer Union Bancaire Privee (UBP) for an undisclosed amount. The part-sale of Coutts, which counts Queen Elizabeth II among its rich and famous clients, is in line with RBS's strategy of scaling back its international operations following a huge bailout of the bank by the British government during the 2008 financial crisis. RBS will keep Coutts' British arm following the deal for the international unit reportedly worth between $600 million and $800 million (550 million and 730 million euros), according to the Financial Times newspaper.


  • Yemen weighs on Asian shares, Japan gains on stimulus hopes 

    FILE - This Oct. 2, 2015 file photo shows the facade of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. U.S. stocks are edging lower in midday trading Thursday, March 26, 2015, extending the market’s losses to a fourth day. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)TOKYO (AP) — Asian shares were lackluster Friday as investors monitored violence in the Middle East but Japan's market rose after weak economic data boosted hopes for more central bank stimulus.


  • With Yemen strikes, Saudis show growing independence from U.S. By Matt Spetalnick, Warren Strobel and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Saudi Arabia kept some key details of its military action in Yemen from Washington until the last moment, U.S. officials said, as the kingdom takes a more assertive regional role to compensate for perceived U.S. disengagement. The Middle East's top oil power told the United States weeks ago it was weighing action in Yemen but only informed Washington of the exact details just before Thursday's unprecedented air strikes against Iran-allied Houthi rebels, the officials said. U.S. President Barack Obama's Middle East policy increasingly relies on surrogates rather than direct U.S. military involvement.
  • Turmoil in Yemen escalates as Saudi Arabia bombs rebels 

    People search for survivors under the rubble of houses destroyed by Saudi airstrikes near Sanaa Airport, Yemen, Thursday, March 26, 2015. Saudi Arabia launched airstrikes Thursday targeting military installations in Yemen held by Shiite rebels who were taking over a key port city in the country's south and had driven the embattled president to flee by sea, security officials said. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)SANAA, Yemen (AP) — The turmoil in Yemen grew into a regional conflict Thursday, with Saudi Arabia and its allies bombing Shiite rebels allied with Iran, while Egyptian officials said a ground assault will follow the airstrikes.


  • Yemeni leader Hadi leaves country as Saudi Arabia keeps up air strikes 

    Houthi fighters sit on a tank near the Presidential Palace in SanaaBy Khaled Abdallah and Sami Aboudi SANAA/ADEN, Yemen (Reuters) - Yemen's President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi left his refuge in Aden for Saudi Arabia on Thursday as Houthi rebels battled with his forces on the outskirts of the southern port city. Throughout the day, warplanes from Saudi Arabia and Arab allies struck at the Shi'ite Houthis and allied army units, who have taken over much of the country and seek to oust Hadi. Warplanes resumed bombing the Houthi-held capital Sanaa on Thursday evening, shaking whole neighborhoods and terrifying residents. We live near the airport, where we think a lot of the Houthi leaders are living and many of the air strikes are." Houthi leader Abdel-Malek al-Houthi said in a televised speech Yemenis would confront the "criminal, unjust and unjustified aggression" by Saudi Arabia.


  • Turkey's Erdogan says can't tolerate Iran bid to dominate Middle East By Humeyra Pamuk ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan accused Iran on Thursday of trying to dominate the Middle East and said its efforts have begun annoying Ankara, as well as Saudi Arabia and Gulf Arab countries. Turkey earlier said it supports the Saudi-led military operation against Houthi rebels in Yemen and called on the militia group and its "foreign supporters" to abandon acts which threaten peace and security in the region. "Iran is trying to dominate the region," said Erdogan, who is due to visit Tehran in early April. This has begun annoying us, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf countries.
  • Iran's Rouhani intervenes as deadline for nuclear deal approaches 

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organisation Ali Akbar Salehi and Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif wait with others in LausanneBy John Irish and Louis Charbonneau LAUSANNE, Switzerland (Reuters) - Iran's president spoke with the leaders of France, Britain, China and Russia on Thursday in an apparent effort to break an impasse to a nuclear deal between Tehran and major world powers. He also raised the Saudi-led military operation against Iranian-backed Houthi fighters in Yemen, as did U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry ahead of nuclear negotiations in Switzerland with Tehran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif.


  • Obama discusses Yemen, Iran in call with Turkey's Erdogan WASHINGTON/ISTANBUL (Reuters) - President Barack Obama spoke with Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan on Thursday about pressing issues in the Middle East, including the crisis in Yemen, the White House said. The hour-long call was initiated by Turkey, sources in the Turkish president's office said. It came on a day when Erdogan later complained at a news conference that "Iran is trying to dominate the region" and must withdraw forces from Yemen, Syria and Iraq.

 

 

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